Reduce your risk

Reducing Your Cancer Risk

According to the American Institute for Cancer Research, nearly one-third of cancers can be prevented. Here are some tips to Get in Front of cancer.

1. Don’t smoke or be exposed to secondhand smoke
Cancers known or thought to be smoking-related, at least in part, include cancers of the lung, oral cavity and pharynx, esophagus, stomach, colorectum, liver, pancreas, larynx, bladder, kidney, and acute myeloid leukemia.

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2. Maintain a healthy weight
Obesity has been linked to a number of cancers including colorectal, kidney, ovarian, pancreatic, thyroid and uterine. 

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3. Eat nutritious foods and limit alcohol consumption
Colorectal cancer has been linked to a high consumption of red meat. Below are select recipes, presentations and CPIC studies looking at the impact of a healthy diet and alcohol.

Recipes:

 Download the recipe

  Download the recipe

 Download the recipe

Consider eating organic especially for fruits/vegetables with the most pesticide residues. Visit the Environmental Working Group for a list of the Dirty 12. The UC Berkeley School of Public Health CHAMACOS Study and Environmental Exposures pages provide helpful information about pesticides.

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4. Exercise
Exercise has been shown to reduce your cancer risk in a number of studies.

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5. Understand the melanoma risk factors 
Caucasians and others with light skin are at the greatest risk for melanoma. Protect your skin when you are outdoors and avoid tanning beds.

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6. Avoid hormone therapy
 
Breast, ovarian and uterine cancers have been linked to hormone therapy.

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7. Get a good night’s sleep in a dark room
 
Light-at-night may disrupt the internal body clock and increase breast cancer risk.      

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8. Understand how your environment impacts your risk
 
The Environmental Research Group, based in Berkeley, California, is a vital component of the Cancer Prevention Institute of California. Nationally recognized researchers are dedicated to understanding the environmental causes of cancer. Using geographic information systems tools, the group assesses geographic disparities in exposures and cancer outcomes throughout California.

9. Get the recommended cancer screenings
Early detection is an important way to Get in Front of cancer.


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10. Protect yourself with the HPV vaccine

Recent declines in the incidence of cervical cancer may be attributed to the use of the vaccine against common strains of HPV. This important anti-cancer vaccine has resulted in declines of HPV prevalence which may translate to reduced numbers of throat and genital area cancers in the U.S. For example, rates of HPV related throat cancers have increased four to five fold over the last decade and it is hoped that this vaccine will prevent younger populations from becoming HPV positive and being subjected to this potentially disfiguring disease.

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Photo credits:
Smoking icon: Image credit: Ahmad Hania License: CC Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0A
Scale: Image credit: Icons8
Fork/knife: Image credit: Icons8
Walking: Image credit: Icons8
Pill: MedicalWP License: CC Attribution 4.0
Bed: Image credit: Icons8
Medical briefcase: Icons8

© Cancer Prevention Institute of California