Eating a soy-rich diet found to reduce mortality for women with more aggressive breast cancers

March 2017



Eating a soy-rich diet found to reduce mortality for women with more aggressive breast cancers

Consuming more foods rich in isoflavones, a compound primarily found in soy beans, was found to decrease the risk of death of women diagnosed with some types of breast cancer. For all breast cancers combined, mortality was reduced by 21 percent. When considering specific types of breast cancer, lower mortality was found only for women whose tumors lacked estrogen and progesterone receptors. Mortality was 51% lower for women with hormone receptor negative breast cancers which are more aggressive and have poorer survival. Lower mortality was only seen in women who didn’t receive endocrine therapy as a treatment for breast cancer.

To conduct this study, researchers analyzed data on 6,235 American and Canadian breast cancer patients from the Breast Cancer Family Registry, a National Cancer Institute-funded program that has collected clinical and questionnaire data on enrolled participants and their families since 1995. The Cancer Prevention Institute of California (CPIC) manages the Northern California site. CPIC researcher Esther John Ph.D., M.S.P.H. collaborated on this study. Read the press release.




Is your nail salon healthy? Join us for a manicure and find out what CPIC discovered about nail salons

Join us in San Francisco on Thursday, April 20 for a pampering, healthy manicure, hear a little about what CPIC researcher Thu Quach discovered about the air quality in nail salons, get the scoop on how easy it is to select a nail salon that meets expanded safety guidelines, and find out what chemicals you should avoid in nail polishes.

You’ll take home a travel bath set compliments of elizabethW, a toxic-free nail polish compliments of Spa Ritual, and a wine glass compliments of Lifefactory as our gifts to you. Light bites and refreshments will be served.
Tickets are extremely limited so reserve your spot now.



 
March is Colon Cancer Awareness Month

Colorectal cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer among Greater Bay Area men and women according to the Greater Bay Area Cancer Registry 2016 Annual Incidence and Mortality Review.

Take a look at our colon cancer infographic to get the facts and tips to decrease your risk of colon cancer.




Reserve your spot at the 18th Annual PlumpJack/LINK Golf Classic to support CPIC breast cancer education

The 18th Annual PlumpJack/LINK Golf Classic to support breast cancer education at CPIC will take place on May 1 at Lake Merced Golf and Country Club. CPIC Board of Trustee Hilary Newsom Callan and her husband Geoff Callan host this annual event in honor of their mothers, Tessa Newsom, who succumbed to breast cancer in 2002, and Barbara Callan, a 29-year breast cancer survivor. 

The event includes breakfast, a chipping and putting contest, an 18-hole shotgun golf game, lunch, on-course activities throughout the day, a cocktail reception, silent and live auctions, a sit-down dinner, and entertainment.

The PlumpJack/LINK Golf Classic has raised more than $3.75 million for CPIC to provide critical community education funding.

Support the important work CPIC does by registering today for this year’s PlumpJack/LINK Golf Classic!



 
A rare, behind-the-scenes look at a CPIC epidemiologist

This month we continue our behind-the-scenes look into the world of a CPIC epidemiologist. What do they do? How are they helping to get in front of cancer? Get to know Salma Shariff-Marco.





  Hundreds attend the 16th Annual Breast Cancer Conference

Over 200 breast cancer survivors, health care professionals and researchers attended the 16th Annual Breast Cancer Conference: The Current Breast Cancer Landscape in the Bay Area at the Presidio, San Francisco on March 4. The full-day conference offered 13 sessions on a wide variety of topics. Throughout the day, speakers were available to answer questions and survivors found support with other breast cancer survivors.

If you were unable to attend, you can still download some of the speaker’s slides on our website and view a few photos from the conference on our Instagram and Facebook pages.

Our special appreciation to the California Breast Cancer Research Program, the exclusive Survivor Champion sponsor of this year’s conference.

© Cancer Prevention Institute of California